University of Maryland SLLC 499W: Introduction to GLOBAL DIGITAL HUMANITIES
  • Author:MTM
  • Comments:0

New Course: Introduction to GLOBAL DIGITAL HUMANITIES

I have been developed a new course entitled “SLLC 499w: Introduction to Global Digital Humanities” for the spring 2016 semester at University of Maryland, College Park. A draft of the syllabus can be found here. Please add your comments and suggestions!

Here is the course description:

Introduction to Global Digital Humanities seeks to provide a more ‘global’ window on the field of Digital Humanities (DH) and its associated technologies. Building on other critical approaches to DH (e.g. Postcolonial Digital Humanities, #TransformDH, Global Outlook::Digital Humanities (GO::DH)), it aims to both constructively problematize DH as a field from multiple ‘peripheral’ perspectives and introduce students to some of the technologies they can utilize to make DH more ‘global.’ The ‘global’ in ‘Global DH’ is meant in two senses: we will foreground contributions to and critiques of DH from both the widest possible geographic range and other (digital) communities that are peripheral in the DH field due their linguistic, racial, sexual, or technological particularities.

I will be experimenting with a new class format for Thursday classes: rotating between “Tool/Studio Thursdays” and “THATCamp Thursdays.” From the syllabus:

Thursday classes—after the first three weeks of background reading—will alternate between Tool/Studio Thursdays and THATCamp Thursdays.

Tool/Studio Thursdays: These class days will allow students to learn about a particular technology of their choice that they will be responsible for presenting to the class and utilizing in their final project. The range of technologies you can choose from will be extensive: Omeka,  digital media production software(s), Python, TEI-XML, web scraping, topic modeling (through R or Mallet), amongst many others. A full range of options and links to tutorials on each will be provided to you (see “Tool/Studio handout” on Canvas), and you are free to propose additional options as well. In each “Tool/Studio Thursday” session, you will present the technology you have decided to use, discuss the problems you have encountered, and seek feedback from your peers. These sessions will be an opportunity for you to learn more about existing technologies, provide feedback to your peers, and, importantly, learn about the limits and biases in technologies, especially when it comes to working with ‘global’ languages and cultures.

THATCamp Thursdays: These class days will loosely be based on the THATCamp (The Humanities and Technology Camp) model, which is a collaborative, informal, and semi-spontaneous meeting format that is less hierarchical and more interdisciplinary. Some THATCamp Thursdays have pre-defined foci, but a few are “open” THATCamp days. For these “open” days, the class will collectively determine at the end of Tuesday’s class what the topic or technology is that they want to focus on for Thursday’s class. This will give the class an opportunity to focus on a topic, tool, or technology that they either want to return to or do not see dealt with in the remainder of the syllabus. Although we will collectively specify the broad contours of these THATCamp Thursday at the end of Tuesday’s class and participants will be asked to come prepared for these THATCamp class days with specific contributions, the direction of these class days themselves will be in the hands of the THATCamp Thursday participants (students, instructors, and class visitors).

Below is a first draft of the class/reading schedule (still subject to change). I would love to hear any comments or suggestions you may have. Please add them here.

 

Week 1: What is/are the Digital Humanities (DH[s])?

1/26/2016 Tuesday: Class Introduction

Discussion of class structure and expectations.

1/28/2016 Thursday: What is/are the Digital Humanities (DH[s])?

Kirschenbaum, Matthew. “What is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities, edited by Matthew K. Gold (Minnesota, 2012): http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/38

Read for discussion about THATCamp Thursdays (starting in week four of the course): “What is a ThatCamp?” Available here: http://thatcamp.org/about/

Week 2: The Necessity for and Problem with ‘Global’ DH

2/2/2016 Tuesday: How Global is DH?

Fiormonte, Domenico. “Digital Humanities from a Global Perspective.” Laboratorio dell’ISPE XI (2014): 2-18.

Clavert, Frédéric. “The Digital Humanities multicultural revolution did not happen yet.” L’histoire contemporaine à l’ère numérique. April 26th, 2013. Url: http://histnum.hypotheses.org/1546

2/4/2016: How Global is DH (cont.)? And, what is the problem with the term ‘Global’?

Crane, Gregory. “The Big Humanities, National Identity and the Digital Humanities in Germany.” July 20, 2015. Url: http://tinyurl.com/obcmpzh

Fiormonte, Domenico. “Towards monocultural (digital) humanities?” InfoLet. July 12, 2015. Url: http://infolet.it/2015/07/12/monocultural-humanities/

Fiormonte, Domenico. “Towards a Cultural Critique of Digital Humanities.” Historical Social Research 37:3 (2012): 59-76.

Class writing prompt: What is the problem with the term ‘global’? (write short paragraph to share with class)

 

Week 3: Critical Approaches to DH I

2/9/2016 Tuesday: Race and DH   

McPherson, Tara. “Why are the Digital Humanities So White? or Thinking the Histories of Race and Computation.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities, edited by Matthew K. Gold. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, 2012. Url: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/29

Liu, Alan. “Where is Cultural Criticism in the Digital Humanities?” In Debates in the Digital Humanities, edited by Matthew K. Gold. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, 2012. Url: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/20

Earhart, Amy E. “Can Information Be Unfettered? Race and the New Digital Humanities Canon.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities, edited by Matthew K. Gold. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, 2012. Url: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/16

2/11/2016 Thursday: Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies and DH

Harding, Sandra. “Postcolonial and feminist philosophies of science and technology: convergences and dissonances.” Postcolonial Studies 12:4 (2009): 401-421.

Philip, Kavita, Lilly Irani, and Paul Dourish. “Postcolonial Computing: A Tactical Survey.” Science, Technology & Human Values 37 (2012): 3-29.

Golumba, David. “Postcolonial Studies, Digital Humanities, and the Politics of Language.” uncomputing. May 31st, 2013. Url: http://www.uncomputing.org/?p=241

 

Week 4: Critical Approaches to DH II

2/16/2016 Tuesday: #TransformDH & Critical Code Studies

Lothian, Alexis and Amanda Phillips. “Can Digital Humanities Mean Transformative Critique?” Journal of E-Media Studies 3:1 (2013): http://journals.dartmouth.edu/cgi-bin/WebObjects/Journals.woa/xmlpage/4/article/425 (PDF available on ELMS too).

Gil, Alex. “#GuerillaDH.” @elotroalex. July 27th, 2015. Url: http://elotroalex.webfactional.com/guerrilladh/

Marino, Mark C. “Critical Code Studies.” Electronic Book Review (12/4/2006): http://www.electronicbookreview.com/thread/electropoetics/codology

2/18/2016 THATCamp Thursday: Global and Transformative DH Projects

Bring:

An example of a “Global DH” project (complete or ongoing) that you are ready to present to the class.

Check out “TransformDH Digital Humanities” projects list here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/15caTX2281lvG4J0EN9YwgN0pcsbpXeiUVj1m59N5J0Y/edit#

Check out De/Post/Colonial Humanities projects listed here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1KzQZ5rV3hkPoiX2ZBMi-s2sfW8KuZKU0iRXGjiaTQV8/edit?pli=1

Check out Global Outlook::Digital Humanities (GO:DH)’s “Around DH in 80 Days.” Project introduction here: http://www.globaloutlookdh.org/491-2/  and full list here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1_PNv9Jlw_QlUh6SeYJrGYFucoRzlZAfLf7OouWu-qe4/edit#gid=3&vpid=A1

Check out Social Justice and the Digital Humanities list of “Social Justice Digital Humanities Projects” here: http://criticaldh.roopikarisam.com/social-justice-digital-humanities-projects/

 

Week 5: Intersectional DH

2/23/2016 Tuesday: An Intersectional DH

Risam, Roopika. “Beyond the Margins: Intersectionality and the Digital Humanities.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 9:2 (2015): http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/9/2/000208/000208.html

Class Writing Prompt: In light of the readings from the past four weeks, what are some of the most pressing problems in the field of DH currently and how would you personally like to make it more ‘global’ (in the dual sense of this word we have discussed)? (3-4 pages, and be sure to cite from the readings during the first four weeks of this course)

2/25/2016 Tool/Studio Thursday

Beginning this week, you will be asked to pick a technological tool you will be learning and working with in the remainder of this course. Are you interested in digital archiving exhibition? Then you might choose to learn Omeka and use it in your final project? Are you interested in computational textual analysis? Then you might choose to learn R. Are you interested in coding or corpus creation? Then you might want to learn Python, TEI-XML, web scraping, or topic modeling (through R or Mallet). A full range of options and links to tutorials on each will be provided to you (see “Tool/Studio handout” on Canvas), and you are free to propose additional options as well. In each “Tool/Studio Thursday” session, you will present the technology you have decided to use, discuss the problems you have encountered, and seek feedback from your peers. These sessions will be an opportunity for you to both learn more about the existing technologies and also provide feedback to your peers on their project.

 

Week 6: The Politics of Gaming I

3/1/2016 Tuesday: War and Colonialism and Gaming

Owens, Trevor. “Sid Meiers Colonization: Is it Offensive Enough?” Playthepast. Nov. 23rd, 2010. Url: http://www.playthepast.org/?p=278

Owens, Trevor. “Modding the History of Science: Values at Play in Modder Discussions of Sid Meier’s CIVILIZATION.” Simulation & Gaming 42 (2011): 481-495.

Owens, Trevor. “if(!isNative())[return false] De-Peopling Native Peoples in Sid Meiers Colonization.” Playthepast. March 1, 2012. Url: http://www.playthepast.org/?p=278

3/3/2016 THATCamp Thursday on “Gaming”:  

Before class, play:

Peter Brinson and Kurosh ValaNejad. “The Cat and the Coup.” Available here: http://www.thecatandthecoup.com/

In class, discussion led by: Kurosh ValaNejad

 

Week 7: The Politics of Gaming II

3/8/2016 Tuesday: Representation in Games

Šisler, Vít. “Digital Arabs: Representation in video games.” European Journal of Cultural Studies 11:2 (2008): 203-219.

Nakamura, Lisa. “Don’t Hate the Player, Hate the Game: The Racialization of Labor in World of Warcraft.” In Digital Labor: The Internet as Playground and Factory, 187-204. New York: Routledge, 2013.

3/10/2016 Tool/Studio Thursday

You will present the technology you have decided to use, discuss the problems you have encountered, and seek feedback from your peers. These sessions will be an opportunity for you to both learn more about the existing technologies and also provide feedback to your peers on their project. By this second “Tool/Studio Thursday” you should have at least a basic understanding of the technology and you should be thinking how you can use this piece of technology for your final project. Be ready to discuss this.

 

Spring Break Week: 3/13/2014-3/20/2014 (No Classes)

 

Week 8: The Politics of Gaming III

3/22/2016 Tuesday: Critiquing Games  

Over spring break, you will need to find a game, write a critical review of it (3-4 pages written or in form of Powerpoint/Prezi), and present your review of it to class (showing us parts of the game as you discuss it).

3/24/2016 Tool/Studio Thursday

You will present the technology you have decided to use, discuss the problems you have encountered, and seek feedback from your peers. These sessions will be an opportunity for you to both learn more about the existing technologies and also provide feedback to your peers on their project. By this third “Tool/Studio Thursday” you should have begun some initial experiments with your selected technology and you should be ready to present them to the class. Discuss too how your work with the technology is changing your thinking about your final project.

Week 9: The Globalization of the Digital I

3/29/2016 Tuesday: Globalization and the Politics of the Digital  

Chan, Anita Say. Networking Peripheries: Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2013, ix-19.

Gajjala, Radhika. “Subaltern Empowerment, Socio-Economic Globalization and Digital Divides.” In Cyberculture and the Subaltern: Weavings of the Virtual and the Real. Lexington Press, 2012, 1-34.

Thorat, Dhanashree. “Politics of Access.” Hastac Blog (November 18th, 2015): https://www.hastac.org/blogs/dhanashree/2015/11/18/politics-access

3/31/2016 THATCamp Thursday: Topic Open (TBD by class)!

The topic/foci of open THATCamp days will be determined by the class at the end of Tuesday’s class. Open THATCamp days will give the class an opportunity to focus on a topic, tool, or technology that they either want to return to or do not see dealt with in the remainder of the syllabus.

 

Week 10: The Globalization of the Digital II

4/5/2016 Tuesday: Social Media

Tufekci, Zeynep. “Big Questions for Social Media Big Data: Representativeness, Validity and Other Methodological Pitfalls.” In ICWSM ’14: Proceedings of the 8th International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (2014): 505-514.

Brock, André. “From the Blackhand Side: Twitter as a Cultural Conversation.” Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 56/4 (2012): 529-549.

*To be added: article on role of Twitter in Green Movement/Arab Spring.

4/7/2016 Thursday Tool Workshop: Working with Twitter Data (Presented by Edward Summers)

Edward Summers (Lead Developer at MITH) will present his research and digital archival work on the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

 

Week 11: The Globalization of the Digital III

4/12/2016 Tuesday: Internet as Playground and Factory

Scholz, Trebor. “Introduction: Why Does Digital Labor Matter Now?” In Digital Labor: The Internet as Playground and Factory, 1-10. New York: Routledge, 2013.

Aytes, Ayhan. “Return of the Crowds: Mechanical Turk and Neoliberal States of Exception.” In Digital Labor: The Internet as Playground and Factory, 79-97. New York: Routledge, 2013.

Pick one other chapter from Digital Labor: The Internet as Playground and Factory (New York: Routledge, 2013) and prepare a brief summary of it to present to the class.

4/14/2016 THATCamp Thursday: The Digital Sweatshop

The Digital Sweatshop: Amazon Turk in class experience. Arrive ready to work!

 

Week 12: Digital Platforms, Hardware, Technology, and the Global Community I

4/19/2016 Tuesday: The Politics of Platforms, Hardware, and Access I

Golumbia, David. “Computation, Globalization, and Global Striation.” In The Cultural Logic of Computation. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009, 129-154.

Golumbia, David. “Representing Minority Languages and Cultures on the World Wide Web,” in Language Documentation: Practice and values Edited by Lenore A. Grenoble and N. Louanna Furbee, 159-170 (2010).

“Minimal Computing.” GO:DH Working Group. URL: http://go-dh.github.io/mincomp/about/

4/21/2016 THATCamp Thursday: THATCamp Thursday: Topic Open (TBD by class)!

The topic/foci of open THATCamp days will be determined by the class at the end of Tuesday’s class. Open THATCamp days will give the class an opportunity to focus on a topic, tool, or technology that they either want to return to or do not see dealt with in the remainder of the syllabus.

 

Week 13: Digital Platforms, Hardware, Technology, and the Global Community II

4/26/2016 Tuesday: The Politics of Platforms, Hardware, and Access II

Read “Social Justice and the Digital Humanities” document (ed. Roopika Risam) and pick one topic (and associated link(s) in that topic) to present to class:

Risam,  Roopika (ed.). Social Justice and the Digital Humanities Url: http://criticaldh.roopikarisam.com/criticaldh/access/

4/28/2016 THATCamp Thursday: What does “Global DH” mean to you?

Write: reflecting back on the entire course and all of the readings, write your 1-page Global DH Manifesto (which we will edit in class into a class global DH manifesto or a series of manifestos)

Week 14: What does “Global DH” mean to you? How have you made DH more “global”?

5/3/2016 Tuesday: Presentation of Final Projects, or how have you made DH more “global”?

Class Presentations

5/5/2016  Thursday: Presentation of Final Projects, or how have you made DH more “global”?

Class Presentations

Week 15: Class Wrap-Up

5/10/2016 Tuesday: Class Wrap-Up